Exposé Online banner

Arto Lindsay — O Corpo Sutil - The Subtle Body
(Bar/None 078-2, 1996, CD)

by Steve Robey, Published 1997-02-01

O Corpo Sutil - The Subtle Body Cover art

Lindsay has been a fixture of the New York "No Wave" scene and beyond since the early 80s. His most notable projects have been as vocalist and guitarist for The Lounge Lizards (faux-jazz), frontman and later sideman for The Golden Palominos (avant-funk, eclectic pop), and as leader of the Ambitious Lovers. Like Brian Eno, he seems to consider himself a "non-musician" — that is, his guitar solos never seem to behave in any kind of rational way, his vocals have generally strayed towards the bizarre, and his whole approach to music-making has been difficult to swallow (but rewarding for those who really dig what's going on).

Arto's latest project, however, sounds nothing like anything I've mentioned above. Lindsay was raised in Brazil in his youth, and throughout his career he has toyed with Brazilian folk idioms. This new album, however, brings his Brazilian roots to full fruition. Anyone who has heard the classic jazz album by Stan Getz and Astrud Gilberto (yes, with "The Girl from Ipanema" on it) will get serious déjà vu here. Of course, there is no sax on this record, but Lindsay's voice eerily recalls Gilberto's baritone crooning, and guitarist Vinicius Cantuária plucks away convincingly on acoustic guitar. This is probably one of the best make-out records you will see reviewed in Exposé.

Famous names come and go in the process, including Bill Frisell, Joey Baron, Marc Ribot, Melvin Gibbs, and Brian Eno. Kudos also to Nana Vasconcelos, who plays brilliant percussion throughout, and to Ryuichi Sakamoto (an alumnus of Yellow Magic Orchestra) on piano and keyboards. So... the question is, should you buy this? Yes, if you're a fan of Arto or a South American folk enthusiast. However, if you're looking for the next Ambitious Lovers CD, you may want to think twice.


Filed under: New releases, Issue 11, 1996 releases

Related artist(s): Brian Eno, Bill Frisell, Ryuichi Sakamoto, Arto Lindsay, Cyro Baptista, Marc Ribot / Ceramic Dog, Yuka C. Honda

Latest news

2020-05-15
Phil May of The Pretty Things RIP – We were saddened to learn that Phil May, lead singer and founding member of The Pretty Things, has died at the age of 75. The band's 1968 album S.F. Sorrow is one of the enduring classics of the psychedelic era, and the group existed in various forms until finally retiring in 2018. » Read more

2020-05-14
Jorge Santana RIP – Jorge Santana, noted guitarist, leader of the band Malo and brother to Carlos Santan, died on May 14 at the age of 68. Jorge and Carlos worked together on a number of occasions, though Jorge's career was centered around Malo, solo work, and with Fania All-Stars. » Read more

2020-05-06
Florian Schneider RIP – Florian Schneider, one of the founders of the pioneering electronic group Kraftwerk, has died at the age of 73. Co-founder Ralf Hütter announced that his bandmate had passed away from cancer after a brief illness. » Read more

2020-04-23
Shindig Festival Goes Lock-Down – Here's what they're saying: It's A Happening Thing! The Shindig! Magazine Lockdown Festival. In our days of no large gatherings of people, maybe it's still possible to have a music festival. Shindig! Magazine is giving it a go with a multi-artist streaming extravaganza on Saturday April 25. » Read more

2020-03-24
Bill Rieflin RIP – The sad news reaches us today of Bill Rieflin's death. Rieflin was best known as a drummer in bands ranging from post-punk to industrial to indie-rock to progressive rock, including work with The Blackouts, Ministry, Nine Inch Nails, Swans, Land, and King Crimson. Rieflin had been battling cancer for several years, and succumbed to it on March 24. He was 59. » Read more


Previously in Exposé...

Praxis - Collection – If a guitarist who calls himself Buckethead, wearing a white mask with a Kentucky Fried Chicken bucket on his head and claims he was raised by chickens doesn't frighten the crap out of you, then maybe...  (1999) » Read more



Listen & discover



Print issues