Exposé Online banner

Aurora Lunare — Translunaggio
(Lizard 0135, 2018, CD)

by Henry Schneider, Published 2018-09-09

Translunaggio Cover art

For their new album released this past spring, Aurora Lunare covered nine different prog rock songs as a tribute. The album opens with a cover of Procol Harum’s “A Whiter Shade of Pale.” As I’ve stated many times before, covering an iconic tune is a risky proposition as everyone immediately references the original. Aurora Lunare does a decent job with their cover, but it does “pale” in comparison. They are too heavy on drums and not enough on organ. The second song is a cover of Enrico Simonetti’s “Gamma,” one of many tunes on this album that is unknown to me, which does put me at a disadvantage. Aurora Lunare's cover is a cinematic tune that closes with Spanish guitar. Next is a cover of Banco del Mutuo Soccorso’s “Fino alla Mia Porta” that sounds great and fortunately they did not try to emulate Francisco di Giacomo’s tenor. Then they present Area’s “Hommage a Violette Nozieres” sans the ululating vocals to provide a modern rendition of this song. Leaving the Italians for a break, they cover Yes’ “Don’t Kill the Whale.” I will probably catch some flack for this, but I am not a fan of Yes in any way shape or from, so I am ecstatic with this superior cover with a female vocalist instead of Jon Anderson’s annoying high tenor voice. Then they jump back to Italy for a cover of Goblin’s “Connexion” that is not near as gothic as the original. The next cover is “Lorenzo” by Phil Collins, a musician I lost interest in after he left Genesis and started producing pop music. Aurora Lunare does an excellent job covering this song with its heavy African rhythm. Then I am back in unfamiliar territory with the final two covers of Marillion’s “The Party” and the Flower Kings’ “Trading My Soul.” Aurora Lunare does a fantastic job on these two songs, which can stand on their own. Though probably not as good as their self-titled album, Translunaggio does have its moments that are worthy of notice.


Filed under: New releases, 2018 releases

Related artist(s): Aurora Lunare

Latest news

2020-07-06
Ennio Morricone RIP – Famed composer Ennio Morricone has died at the age of 91. The creator of scores for more than 500 movies, some of his works have become the most recognizable sounds in the history of cinema. His soundtracks for Sergio Leone's Westerns made from 1964 to 1971, are iconic landmarks in film music, but he also composed for dramas, comedies, and other genres. He won the Academy Award for Best Original Score in 2016 for The Hateful Eight. » Read more

2020-06-14
Keith Tippett RIP – One of the giants of British jazz has left us. Keith Graham Tippetts, known professionally as Keith Tippett, died today at the age of 72. His work from the late 60s into the 70s and beyond includes some of the greatest jazz produced in the UK, and stands as an impressive oevre to this day. » Read more

2020-05-15
Phil May of The Pretty Things RIP – We were saddened to learn that Phil May, lead singer and founding member of The Pretty Things, has died at the age of 75. The band's 1968 album S.F. Sorrow is one of the enduring classics of the psychedelic era, and the group existed in various forms until finally retiring in 2018. » Read more

2020-05-14
Jorge Santana RIP – Jorge Santana, noted guitarist, leader of the band Malo and brother to Carlos Santana, died on May 14 at the age of 68. Jorge and Carlos worked together on a number of occasions, though Jorge's career was centered around Malo, solo work, and with Fania All-Stars. » Read more

2020-05-06
Florian Schneider RIP – Florian Schneider, one of the founders of the pioneering electronic group Kraftwerk, has died at the age of 73. Co-founder Ralf Hütter announced that his bandmate had passed away from cancer after a brief illness. » Read more


Previously in Exposé...

Peter Hammill - Clutch – You can count on the words to be insightful, sometimes bitter, and never trivial. The music always seems to serve the words, not the other way round. With many songwriters, you find lyrics that only...  (2003) » Read more



Listen & discover



Print issues