Exposé Online banner

Eberhard Kranemann / Harald Grosskopf — Krautwerk
(Bureau B BB271, 2017, CD)

by Henry Schneider, Published 2017-09-13

Krautwerk Cover art

Both Harald Grosskopf and Eberhard Kranemann have a long musical legacy dating back to the early days of Krautrock. Eberhard was one of the founding members of Kraftwerk, Neu!, and Pissoff, plus recording under the pseudonym Fritz Müller. Of course, Harald Grosskopf needs no introduction, starting out as the drummer with Wallenstein, Klaus Schulze, Ash Ra, and on to solo and other projects. However these two musicians never met until they were both performing at a festival in 2016. Sensing a kinship, they decided to collaborate, merging their cosmic sonic visions, and Krautwerk is the result. Krautwerk presents six different views of contemporary Krautrock. The disc opens with “Midnight in Düsseldorf Berlin,” a slow electronic melody with sporadic narration, and a steady, almost motorik beat. “Ou Tchi Gah” follows with fuzzed electronics and odd vocal noises that references Kraftwerk’s “Boing Boom Tschak.” “Texas Paris” is a relatively short piece with searing electronics that sounds like a JImi Hendrix guitar solo. “Happy Blue” has a metallic and mechanical sound with a repetitive rhythm sequence that morphs into a happy beat and eventually decays into random sounds as the track ends. “Buddhatal” is perhaps the best track on the disc. This is a dark, pulsating, floating, abstract soundscape with strange electronic animal sounds and squeaks. It is much like Werkbund’s 1987 release “Skaggerak.” The disc closes with “Be Cool,” featuring rapid electronic rhythmic loops, subliminal voices, and lots of variation to maintain your interest. Krautwerk is a wonderful merging of the Berlin and Düsseldorf schools of electronic music, as both musicians continue to be creative and push musical boundaries.


Filed under: New releases, 2017 releases

Related artist(s): Harald Grosskopf, Eberhard Kranemann

Latest news

2018-10-17
Eurock Documentary Seeks Funding – We've been fans and fellow travelers with Archie Patterson and his Eurock project on the journey to discover great music. After many years of promoting and trying to spread the word,a new phase is beginning: a documentary film. Things like this don't just happen, and money does not magically appear to make it happen, so it's up to the fans to get it done. » Read more

2018-09-29
Marty Balin RIP – One of the architects of the 60s psychedelic sound of San Francisco has died at the age of 76. Marty Balin was a singer, songwriter, and guitarist who was one of the founders of Jefferson Airplane. After the split of the original Airplane, Balin went on to form the highly successful Jefferson Starship. » Read more

2018-09-25
Help the Psychic Equalizer Avoid Extinction – Last year we reviewed the debut album by Psychic Equalizer, a musical project of Hugo Selles. He's now working on the ambitious follow-up to that release, and is seeking funding from listeners around the world. » Read more

2018-09-05
Krautrock Documentary Seeks Funding – The next installment of the Progressive Warriors documentary series will focus on the vast body of music that falls under the banner of "krautrock." As most of our readers will know, previous films have tackled RIO and the Canterbury scene, as well as what we might call "mainstream" prog rock. » Read more

2018-07-31
Tomasz Stańko RIP – Tomasz Stańko, one of the greats of Eastern European jazz, has died at the age of 76. Stańko's career started in Krzysztof Komeda's quintet, where he contributed trumpet from 1963-1967, when he formed his own group. He worked extensively with Edward Vesala, Don Cherry, Zbigniew Seifert, Chico Freeman, Howard Johnson, Cecil Taylor, and many others. Many of his recordings have been released by ECM, an association that began in the mid-70s. » Read more


Previously in Exposé...

Cro Magnon - Zapp! – An interesting newcomer in the 'Chamber Music Rock' subgenre, this is a Belgian five piece featuring a lineup of dual violins, keyboards, alto and baritone saxes, and bass. Naturally, as might be...  (1993) » Read more



Listen & discover



Print issues