Exposé Online banner

Marathon — Sublime Dreams
(Music Is Intelligence WMMS 058, 1994, CD)

by Mike Grimes, Published 1995-11-01

Sublime Dreams Cover art

Why do they do that? I hate that! On Sublime Dreams, Marathon commits the cardinal sin of having vocals in a language that they don't quite have in their grasp. The lyrics appear to have been completely composed in another language then translated, word for word, into English. The whole subject / verb agreement thing is out the window. Tenses.. what are they? Listening to these lyrics is another ordeal. It becomes so annoying that it's unbearable after about one song. It's really unfortunate, because his voice is not all that bad. He reminds me a little of Peter Gabriel in places, but with slightly more power. However, his faulty pronunciations and grammatically indecipherable lyrics prevent me from appreciating anything he sings on the album. They should have hired a translator and English coach if they wanted English vocals that badly. By the way, what's wrong with Italian, guys?

Anyway, what about the music? If you can get past or (in my case) ignore the lyrics, there is some enticing music to be heard. The guitars are a mix of metal, heavy metal, and shred metal. Feedback, harmonics, and dive-bombs are used in almost every song, and any note that is held longer than half a second is pitch bent with the whammy bar. It's kind of like an espresso version of Randy Rhoads – so much so that it's humorous. Even though it's amusing sometimes, the guitar does have some really cool parts. One of the most distinctive aspects of the music is the effective use of sudden changes between major and minor keys – occasionally twice within one measure. Rarely have I heard this technique used in such a clever way. The drums have exaggerated and overdone effects processing which occasionally takes away from the parts played by the other instruments. If it wasn't for the lacking vocals and lyrics, the album would be a decent prog metal album.


Filed under: New releases, Issue 8, 1994 releases

Related artist(s): Marathon

Latest news

2018-11-16
The Seventeenth Dream of Dr Sardonicus Festival Tickets Now Available – Fruits de Mer Records and their merry crew of psychedelic explorers are getting set to present the next The Seventeenth Dream of Dr. Sardonicus Festival. The dates are set for August 2-4, 2019 at The Cellar Bar in Cardigan, Wales. They've also announced that the legendary Groundhogs will top the bill. » Read more

2018-11-02
Charles O'Meara (C.W. Vrtacek) RIP – A true musical original has left us. Charles O'Meara, who recorded under the name C.W. Vrtacek, was a wild-card musical talent, ranging from complex progressive rock to introspective modern compositions, with stops at many places inbetween. » Read more

2018-10-17
Eurock Documentary Seeks Funding – We've been fans and fellow travelers with Archie Patterson and his Eurock project on the journey to discover great music. After many years of promoting and trying to spread the word,a new phase is beginning: a documentary film. Things like this don't just happen, and money does not magically appear to make it happen, so it's up to the fans to get it done. » Read more

2018-09-29
Marty Balin RIP – One of the architects of the 60s psychedelic sound of San Francisco has died at the age of 76. Marty Balin was a singer, songwriter, and guitarist who was one of the founders of Jefferson Airplane. After the split of the original Airplane, Balin went on to form the highly successful Jefferson Starship. » Read more

2018-09-25
Help the Psychic Equalizer Avoid Extinction – Last year we reviewed the debut album by Psychic Equalizer, a musical project of Hugo Selles. He's now working on the ambitious follow-up to that release, and is seeking funding from listeners around the world. » Read more


Previously in Exposé...

Mellow Candle - Swaddling Songs – I think this one may have been repressed again, since I have seen many copies poke their heads out recently. This album in my opinion is the pinnacle of English progressive folk a la The Trees,...  (1993) » Read more



Listen & discover



Print issues