Exposé Online banner

Moby Grape — Moby Grape
(Sundazed SC11190, 1967/2007, CD)

Moby Grape — Wow
(Sundazed SC11191, 1968/2007, CD)

Moby Grape — Grape Jam
(Sundazed SC11192, 1968/2007, CD)

by Peter Thelen, Published 2008-01-01

Moby Grape Cover artWow Cover artGrape Jam Cover art

One of the very best of the late 60s San Francisco bands (if not the best), Moby Grape's recordings as well as the band's name itself has long been tied up in endless cycles of litigation thanks to former manager Matthew Katz. What has been available thus far were shabbily mastered CDs of Moby Grape and a 2-on-1 massacre of Wow and Grape Jam on Katz' own San Francisco Sounds label. Finally last year, the band won the rights to their name back, clearing the way for proper reissues of their five Columbia era long players. Moby Grape 69 and Truly Fine Citizen are planned for later in 2007.

The debut album is nothing short of a masterpiece. Thirteen tracks of catchy melodies and memorable lyrics, where rock and roll hooks abound and all five members of the band could sing lead or harmony well; In contrast to most of the San Francisco bands of the day, their sound was not laden with extended psychedelic jams, but instead presented in concise, well written two-to-three minute statements, authored by any combination of the five band members, all of whom could write great songs. Their sound was a well balanced combination of rock styles, at once informed by folk, blues, country, sixties soul, and jazz. By today's standards, much of what's presented here would be called roots rock. Any one of those thirteen had single potential, although Columbia's decision to release five singles from the album at once massively backfired and only one, "Omaha," ever charted. Few albums of that era pack as much good material and zero filler. This reissue includes five bonus tracks of the same vintage, two previously unissued.

The band's second album Wow was originally packaged with a free second LP (Grape Jam) for the same price as a single LP. Due to the fact that all of both wouldn't fit on a single CD (as well as accommodate bonus tracks) Sundazed has broken them out into two separate reissues, which is fair also because the two are in fact very different. In almost every respect, Wow is as strong as the first album, perhaps a bit more refined production-wise, and by this time some psychedelicisms are starting to creep in on a few of the songs. Some of the rough edges of the first are smoothed out, plus a few songs feature string arrangements, though never overpowering the songs. The sped-up voices on the country rocker "Funky-Tunk" and the 1930s parody "Just Like Gene Autry: A Foxtrot" are interesting sidetracks along the way, but songs like "Rose Colored Eyes," "Murder in My Heart for the Judge," and "Motorcycle Irene" are a match for anything on the first album. Six previously unreleased bonus tracks are included with this one.

Grape Jam is the oddity here. Of course Moby Grape's strengths and reputation on record up to this point were based on concise executions of carefully composed three-minute songs. Live, those stretched out a bit longer, but Grape certainly weren't considered a jam band in the sense of The Dead, Quicksilver, and others. Grape Jam showcased what the band could do for the most part just jamming in the studio, along with some guest players like Al Kooper and Mike Bloomfield (several months before the release of Super Session), plus a slow blues vocal cut that opens the proceedings. The jams are great fun, even if a little long-winded at times, and showcase some great playing mostly in an electric bluesy style that was so prevalent at the time. Closing the original disc was "The Lake," a bizarrely psychedelic meandering with lyrics written by somebody outside the band, and is pretty much a throwaway. Three lengthy bonus cuts are included, the last being an arrangement of "Bags' Groove" with Kooper, Randy Brecker on trombone, and part of Blood Sweat & Tears horn section. Overall, Grape Jam is not as essential as the first and Wow, but solid nonetheless.


Filed under: Reissues, Issue 35, 2007 releases, 1967 recordings, 1968 recordings

Related artist(s): Moby Grape

Latest news

2020-07-06
Ennio Morricone RIP – Famed composer Ennio Morricone has died at the age of 91. The creator of scores for more than 500 movies, some of his works have become the most recognizable sounds in the history of cinema. His soundtracks for Sergio Leone's Westerns made from 1964 to 1971, are iconic landmarks in film music, but he also composed for dramas, comedies, and other genres. He won the Academy Award for Best Original Score in 2016 for The Hateful Eight. » Read more

2020-06-14
Keith Tippett RIP – One of the giants of British jazz has left us. Keith Graham Tippetts, known professionally as Keith Tippett, died today at the age of 72. His work from the late 60s into the 70s and beyond includes some of the greatest jazz produced in the UK, and stands as an impressive oevre to this day. » Read more

2020-05-15
Phil May of The Pretty Things RIP – We were saddened to learn that Phil May, lead singer and founding member of The Pretty Things, has died at the age of 75. The band's 1968 album S.F. Sorrow is one of the enduring classics of the psychedelic era, and the group existed in various forms until finally retiring in 2018. » Read more

2020-05-14
Jorge Santana RIP – Jorge Santana, noted guitarist, leader of the band Malo and brother to Carlos Santana, died on May 14 at the age of 68. Jorge and Carlos worked together on a number of occasions, though Jorge's career was centered around Malo, solo work, and with Fania All-Stars. » Read more

2020-05-06
Florian Schneider RIP – Florian Schneider, one of the founders of the pioneering electronic group Kraftwerk, has died at the age of 73. Co-founder Ralf Hütter announced that his bandmate had passed away from cancer after a brief illness. » Read more


Previously in Exposé...

Electric Orange - Electric Orange – Although this is a new release, Dirk Jan Muller and company (aka Electric Orange) have faithfully turned the clock back almost 25 years, trapped in time around 1970. Indeed, this album evokes the...  (1994) » Read more



Listen & discover



Print issues