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Necro Deathmort — The Capsule
(Rocket Recordings LAUNCH 095, 2016, LP / CD)

by Henry Schneider, Published 2016-09-17

The Capsule Cover art

For those of you who do not know, Necro Deathmort is the English synth duo of Matthew Roziek and AJ Cookson, and their goal “to make electronic music that was as heavy as doom metal, wth absolutely filthy bass.” To my ears, the music on this disc is not particularly scary or macabre, though it does have heavy distortion and a fuzzy bass. The disc opens with “In Waves,” a noisy dark electronic piece with rhythmic beats, nothing really to get excited about. Next is “First Rays.” This piece starts very quietly like the sun peaking over the horizon, then a rapid pentatonic Tangerine Dream sequence enters along with waves of electronics. “First Rays” is very good. Then we have the slightly sinister and slow “Moonstar” that reminded me a bit of Lustmord. Track four is “Capsule Sickness,” and I’m not sure if this is a drug reference or a space capsule. This is a slow piece that starts very mellow and as the filters open, the focus sharpens. Next is another T. Dream influenced piece, “Crux,” with its sharp metallic and then quiet scary electronics. This piece goes through a number of mood shifts. “Mono/Serum” is basically a long sawtooth “siren” mixed with white noise followed by a rapid pulsating machinelike electronic bass line. The seventh track, “Pecklyn,” has a low rumbling bass foundation with an occasional high frequency wail plus lots of distortion. And the album closes with “Screens,” a heavily processed, reverbed, and tinny sounding piece. I do not hear all the death hype described on the promo sheet, but taken out of context of this information many people will find The Capsule of interest.


Filed under: New releases, 2016 releases

Related artist(s): Necro Deathmort

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