Exposé Online banner

Richard Barbieri — Stranger Inside
(Kscope KSCOPE104, 2008, CD)

by Jeff Melton, Published 2009-07-01

Stranger Inside Cover art

Richard Barbieri’s second solo album is an altogether different beast than 2006’s insightful textural melee Things Buried. Again pairing with veteran band mate from Japan (the band) Steve Jansen, Barbieri has expanded his own palette to Refine his rhythmic palette championed by s composer’s mindset. Drawing from a strong collaborative element, Barbieri has enlisted both Porcupine Tree cohorts Steven Wilson and Gavin Harrison (guest drummer on several tracks) in important roles to flesh out his sharpened structural ideas. Prime examples of this thrust forward are “All Fall Down” and “Hypnotek.” The former piece carries a strong melodic weight carried by evocative piano played chords within a discerning repeated phrase. The latter track relies heavily on sampled percussion to propel an effective but creepy theme (with what sounds like Jon Hassell samples). Further on into the disc we find more distinct imagery in the form of “Abyss” that creates a swoonish premise that is as precious at is purposeful. “Byzantium,” in contrast, is grounded on almost gamelan style percussion running at a break neck pace with minor melodic embellishments for the keyboardist is an expert at employing. The ghostly vocals create tension when spliced with kalimba samples offering an exotic locale to the destinations traveled on the recording. Other notable tracks include “Cave,” which opens with an assertive synthetic drum pattern and the keyboardist’s strictly analog swelling. In closing, the textural composer seems now firmly rooted on his own expansive path direction to be determined.


Filed under: New releases, Issue 37, 2008 releases

Related artist(s): Richard Barbieri, Steve Jansen, Steven Wilson / I.E.M., Gavin Harrison, Tim Bowness, Danny Thompson

Latest news

2021-01-18
Asia Minor Third Album on the Way – On January 29, AMS records will be releasing the long-awaited third album by classic Turkish-French band Asia Minor. Released last year in Japan, this will be the widespread debut of Points of Libration. The album features original members Setrak Bakirel (vocals, guitar) and Eril Tekeli (flute, guitar). » Read more

2020-12-09
Harold Budd RIP – Harold Budd, one of pre-eminent American composers of avant-garde and minimalism, has died of complications from the coronavirus. Budd came to prominence in the 70s, championed by Brian Eno on his Obscure Records label, with music that blended academic minimalism with electric jazz and electronic music. Much of Budd's best known work was done in collaboration with other artists, including Eno, Daniel Lanois, Robin Guthrie, Andy Partridge, John Foxx, Jah Wobble, and many others. » Read more

2020-11-20
25 Views of Worthing Finally Gets Released – A while ago, we wrote about the discovery of a "long lost" Canterbury-style gem by a band called 25 Views of Worthing. And now we're pleased to find out that Wind Waker Records has released their music on an LP. » Read more

2020-10-14
Audion Is Back in Business – Our esteemed colleague Alan Freeman has restarted Audion Magazine after a seven year hiatus. The new incarnation is available online on their Bandcamp site. Audion's history goes back to 1984, and included 58 issues up to 2013. Issue #59 is available now, and #60 is in the works. » Read more

2020-10-06
Romantic Warriors IV – Krautrock (Part 2) Is in the Works – Zeitgeist Media, the people who have brought us the great series of documentary films chronicling the history of progressive rock, are working on the second installment of their examination of German music. Krautrock 2 will focus on artists from Münich such as Guru Guru, Amon Düül II, Xhol Caravan, Kraan, Witthüser & Westrupp, and Popol Vuh. » Read more


Previously in Exposé...

Rick Wakeman - Past, Present and Future – At the outset, it would appear that reviewing three CDs of solo piano music from keyboardist Rick Wakeman would be a daunting task. While wrestling with the perception that the pianist can easily sit...  (2011) » Read more



Listen & discover



Print issues