Exposé Online banner

The Spacious Mind — Sailing the Seagoat
(Garageland GRCD 018, 1996, CD)

by Dan Casey, 1996-08-01:

Sailing the Seagoat Cover art

Here's an interesting concept. Take simple folk ideas, add a little psychedelic electronics and synth, add a few flute and bongo lines and some very radio-friendly vocals and brew up some long, explorative songs. This, their third album, consists of five tracks in the eight to 11 minute range, which is a good six or seven minutes shorter than the averages for the last two albums. A few cautions: brace yourself for 45 minutes of nonstop acoustic guitar chord strumming. Right from the beginning, the strumming starts and it literally doesn't let up until the end. The other big point of contention is the quality of the electronics: they are overall amateurish, unoriginal, and thin. The vocals are well-done, but more MTV-ish than you might expect in this genre (lyrics are in well-pronounced English). The bottom line is that this album has a decent premise, but the execution is below average. The music just moves along slowly, never really building to anything. And there are other bands merging the same elements much more successfully. Italy's Dunwich is a prime example, and more original to boot. However, if you enjoyed their prior efforts, this too will satisfy.


by Rob Walker, 1996-08-01:

This third album from The Spacious Mind delivers more of their patented spacy psychedelia. Those familiar with their earlier releases know exactly what to expect; E-bowed guitar leads over a backdrop of swirling synth textures, acoustic guitars, hand percussion and occasional other instruments. The music is mellow, meditative, and hypnotic, smoothly flowing along avoiding any sudden moves. Some vocals occasionally work their way up through the mix, but the majority of this is instrumental. The four long pieces are not as much developments of musical ideas as idle atmospheric soundscapes, which fade in, flow along for a while, and then fade out. The band seems to have mellowed over its three albums; Seagoat has a noticeably diminished variety in the songs and a reduced sense of direction and dynamics compared to the earlier albums, which is to say, this album can be pretty repetitive on a certain level. The sound quality and production, however, are quite excellent, as on the previous discs, and the richness of the various instrumental timbres really benefit from the spaciousness of the mix. There's not a whole lot of musical action on Seagoat, but slip on a pair of headphones and this band which epitomizes spacy psychedelic prog will leave you in a blissful trance... or asleep, depending on your predilection for this genre.


Filed under: New releases , Issue 10 , 1996 releases

Related artist(s): The Spacious Mind

More info

Latest news

2019-03-20
Freedom to Spend Unearths June Chikuma's Archives – Jun (June) Chikuma is well known for her video game and anime soundtracks, but she also released an album of experimental electronic music back in 1986 called Divertimento where she indulged the kind of spontaneity that wouldn't work in a soundtrack. RVNG Int'l label Freedom to Spend is bringing this overlooked item to broader attention with a deluxe reissue. » Read more

2019-03-03
Seaprog 2019 Lineup Almost Complete – The Seaprog festival in Seattle is scheduled for June 7-9 this year, and they've announced their lineup of performers. The revitalized Trettioåriga Kriget will cap Friday night, perennial favorites Marbin are on Saturday, and District 97 will finish off the fest on Sunday night. In support, they've booked a stellar variety of artists from the Northwest and around the world, including EchoTest, Markus Reuter and Trey Gunn, and the live debut of the amazing Troot project. » Read more

2019-02-21
You Can Be Part of an Ambient Electronic Project – The Gesture of History is a new electronic project put together by Sam Rosenthal of Black Tape for a Blue Girl, Steve Roach, and violist Sam Shadow. The music started as an instrumental track Rosenthal was working on for a Black Tape album, but took on a life of its own and demanded further enhancements. The majority of the funds raised will go to manufacturing costs for LP and CD editions, as well as other items as detailed on the Kickstarter page. » Read more

2019-01-31
Keyboardist Ingo Bischof R.I.P. – Keyboard player Ingo Bischof, best known as the longtime keyboard player of German band Kraan, passed away on January 29th, 2019. Bischof was born January 2, 1951 in Berlin-Kreuzberg and joined Kraan in 1975. » Read more

2019-01-11
Jazz Composer Mark Lomax, II Releases Epic 12CD Set – In addition to being a fine jazz drummer, Dr. Mark Lomax, II is a composer in residence at Ohio State University, where he has been very busy on the compositional front. The year 2019 is the 400th anniversary of the arrival of the first ship bringing African slaves to North America, and in commemoration of this, Lomax has produced 400: An Afrikan Epic, a 12 volume set of CDs featuring a variety of different musical ensembles. » Read more


Previously in Exposé...

Seven That Spells - Black Om Rising – Seven That Spells is based in Zagreb, Croatia churning out some of the best mind numbing kaleidoscopic space music this side of the cosmos. Black Om Rising is their fifth release since 2003. Each CD...  (2009) » Read more

Glass - No Stranger to the Skies – The little town of Port Townsend, Washington has special significance to me – I have some very fond memories from there dating back to the 70s. So when I first heard about Glass, a progressive band...  (2002) » Read more

Mike Henderson - White Arrow Project – Mike Henderson was one of the founding members of Djam Karet, and White Arrow Project represents his interest in acoustic guitar based song oriented craft with lyrics. He has assembled a team of other...  (2011) » Read more

Iconoclasta - Resurrección – If anything can be said about this long-running Mexican progressive band, it’s to expect the unexpected. The band has been going in various forms since the early 80s, and no two consecutive...  (2010) » Read more

moe. - No Doy – It's always hard to write objectively about a band which has won over my heart, fully and completely. Such is the case with moe. For those of you who have read Expose #11, you already know from...  (1997) » Read more



Listen & discover



Print issues