Exposé Online banner

What's this all about, anyway ?

Once there was music. Simple music. Maybe a nursery rhyme or a simple folk tune sung by a kind and loving voice. Soon your ears met new music, maybe a classical piece or a fragment of a pop song, a comforting melody that played in your mind the whole day through. The simplicity of youth soon gave way to the anxieties of adolescence; pop music, then perhaps rock — began to speak more directly to your spirit in turmoil. As time went by, your musical tastes continued to develop driven by a hunger for new ideas, reaching for new horizons, fusing new styles and idioms, breaking down the existing limits and barriers. Then one day you found yourself alone, ignored completely by a music and radio industry firmly set on maintaining popular music at its lowest common denominator, while your wide ranging taste for eclectic musical styles and experimentation find you increasingly disconnected from the musical mainstream. Is this you?

This growth and disconnection is what Exposé is all about. Our primary focus is the music that the mainstream ignores; music whose roots seem to have originated somewhere just outside the pop/rock mainstream, but has progressed onwards toward the boundaries of rock, where it meets jazz, classical, folk, avant-garde, electronic and experimental, going well beyond the standard forms into areas of stark and stunning originality. With Exposé, the focus is on the exploration.

Exposé began modestly in the autumn of '93 as a bi-monthly companion newsletter to the Exposure radio show, which focuses on progressive and experimental rock and its periphery. It grew from sixteen to forty pages within one year, and has since settled out as an eighty page quarterly, packed with information on all the music that matters, and the artists who create it. Our typical issue contains artist profiles, interviews, historical perspectives, and much more. You will find well over two hundred reviews of new releases and selected reissues in each issue, and Exposé is the only English language publication that features roundtable reviews of all important new releases — not just one, but three different perspectives on the same release. Our writers are knowledgeable about music and the history of music, many being musicians themselves, and are among the best in the field, having previously written for Gibraltar, Audion, Option, i/e, Eurock, and others.

Latest news

2017-05-19
First ProgStock Festival Set for October – October 2017 will see the inaugural edition of a festival called ProgStock in Rahway, New Jersey at the Union County Performing Arts Center. With a definite slant towards neo-progressive music, the event is sure to please many fans with the inclusion of such artists as Echolyn, Glass Hammer, and Aisles. The festival will take place October 13-15. » Read more

2017-05-05
Clive Brooks RIP – Word reaches us today of another sad passing in the music world. Drummer Clive Brooks, best known as a member of such Canterbury bands as Egg, Uriel / Arzachel, and Groundhogs, has died at the age of 67. Details are sketchy at this point. The news was reported on Nick Mason's Facebook page — Brooks was Mason's drum tech. » Read more

2017-05-02
Col. Bruce Hampton RIP – The phrase "He died doing what he loved" is almost a cliche, but in the case of Col. Bruce Hampton, it couldn't be more true. Hampton, who was born Gustav Berglund III, collapsed on stage at his own 70th birthday celebration and later passed away. The event took place at the Fox Theater in Atlanta. » Read more

2017-04-16
ProgDay 2017 Announces First Bands – Flor de Loto, Sonar, and Infinien are the first three performers to be announced for the 2017 edition of the long-running ProgDay Festival. The 23rd ProgDay takes place Saturday and Sunday, September 2nd and 3rd, at Storybook Farm in Chapel Hill, North Carolina. » Read more

2017-04-16
Allan Holdsworth RIP – Surely in the list of artists who have contributed to the sound of modern music, there is a special spot for guitarist Allan Holdsworth. His name is known to virtually every student of the instrument in jazz and rock, and his style has been so widely emulated that it's hardly worth mentioning anymore — we can just assume that every guitarist has Holdsworth as an influence. » Read more


Previously in Exposé...

Canned Heat / John Lee Hooker - Hooker 'n' Heat, Historical Figures, Ancient Heads, & The New Age – If you don't dig the blues and you don't boogie, skip this review. Canned Heat's stock in trade was merging classic blues with rock, and in the late 60s nobody did it better, due in part...  (2007) » Read more

Ivanhoe - Visions and Reality – The opening instrumental "Visions" sets some high hopes, but the second track bursts in with a simplistic Dream Theater wannabe sound topped off with an annoying vocalist steeped in all the campy...  (1994) » Read more

Francesco Buccheri - Journey / Second Journey – Italian synthesists are a rare breed and only a few of them did anything of note (Cacciapaglia, Baffo Banfi, and very few others). Buccheri was a very obscure musician with a pronounced Teutonic...  (1996) » Read more

Jim Gilmour - Great Escape – Jim Gilmour is well known to Saga fans as the long-time keyboard player of the group. His compositional skills as well as his nimble keyboard playing have been crucial keys to the band’s...  (2007) » Read more

Kevin Leonard - Automatrix – In 1992 Kevin Leonard, North Star's keyboardist, released a self-produced solo cassette of eight jazz influenced progressive instrumental compositions. Now he has released this same music on CD....  (1997) » Read more



Listen & discover



Print issues